My Friend, Chlorophyll–why pH matters.

The other day I mentioned the negative effects of an acidic environment in the body.  This is something I had never really thought much about until recently when I read Brendan Braizer’s book, Thrive.  Since then, pH info has been popping up everywhere!  The more I read, the more intrigued I am by this acid/alkaline stuff.  At first I kind of thought, “Whew!  This is getting way too complicated!” But then I realized that our entire food system has become quite complicated and I’ve got to stay on top of things!  I’m going to try to make this as simple as possible.

The balance of acid and alkaline in the body is referred to as pH (potential of hydrogen) and is measured on a scale from pH 1 (most acidic) to pH 14 (most alkaline).  A neutral pH balance of 7.35 is desirable for optimal health.  An acidic environment in the body negatively affects the body on a cellular level. High acid levels are a form of stress, which leads to high cortisol levels in the body. As I mentioned in my rant about coffee (how I hate to love it), high cortisol levels puts strain on the body and as other systems seek to buffer this strain, they become exhausted, causing immune function to falter—and in walks disease.  Blah.

We can fight it though!  To prevent this nasty acid takeover of the body, we must be proactive in feeding it more alkaline-forming foods and fewer acid forming ones.  This is where my friend, chlorophyll comes in.  Chlorophyll is considered the “blood of the plant”. Chlorophyll synthesizes energy and converts the suns energy into carbohydrate.  Sound familiar?  Yes, Photosynthesis—we learned about in grade school.

Chlorophyll does some amazing acrobatics in our bodies.  It cleanses our blood by removing toxins we’ve acquired through our diets and other environmental sources.  It is also linked to the body’s production of red blood cells—which makes it important for cell regeneration and improving oxygen transport to the body.  This equals more energy.

Here are the pH effects of some common foods we consume in North America. 

Highly Alkaline Forming   (THESE WILL MAKE YOUR BODY HAPPY!)  AlkalineForming Neutral Slightly Acid Forming Highly Acid Forming
AparagusBeets

Bell peppers

Broccoli

Carrots

Celery

Cauliflower

Chicory

Cucumbers

Dill

Dulse

Green beans

Leeks

All leafy greens

Oinion

Parsley

Parsnips

Peas

Sea vegetables

All sprouts

Zucchini

Grape fruit

Lemons

Limes

Mangos

Melons (most)

Papayas

Steveia

Gingerroot

Green tea (WOOHOO!)

Fresh Herbs

Rooibos

Yerba mate (South American Tea—awesome)

 

SquashSweet potatoes

Yams

Amaranth

Buckwheat

Millet

Quinoa

Wild rice

Sesame

Apples

Avocados

Bananas

Berries

Cantaloupe

Cherries

Dates

Figs

Grapes

Nectarines

Oranges

Peaches

Pears

Persimmons

Pineapple

Pomegranates

Flaxseed oil

Hemp oil

Pumpkin seed oil

Almonds

Coconut

Apple cider vinegar

Balsamic vinegar

garlic

 

FlaxseedsHemp seeds

Chia seeds

Coconut oil

Macadamia nuts

Walnuts

Buckwheat

Agave nectar

Dried herbs

Miso paste

Spices

 

Adzuki beansBlack beans

Black-eyed peas

Chickpeas

Lentils

Pumpkin seeds

Sunflower seeds

Brown rice

oats

spelt

Acid Forming

 Cold-water fish

Venison

Wild game

Milk, raw

unprocessed

synthetic multivitamins

 

Commercial cerealsPasta

Refined wheat flour

White rice

Beef

Pork

Shelfish

Butter

Cheese

Cream

Milk, pasteurized

Artificial sweeteners

White sugar

Coffee

Candy

 

You can buy pH strips at the store.  Urine is the best way to test it, but I’ve been advised not to use your first wee of the day because your acid levels are higher than normal.  I have no idea how to come by this in Korea and acting it out isn’t an option (I had to act out pregnancy test at the pharmacy in front of a big crowd–as if I don’t get enough attention as a foreigner in Korea) so I’m excited to get back to the states and check it out.  Your best bet is to eat lots of Chlorophyl containing foods (GREEN!) and limit the amount of processed foods and animal products in your diet.

Get your Chlorophyll on!

Advertisements

One thought on “My Friend, Chlorophyll–why pH matters.

  1. Julie

    Wow. I never thought of it that way. I can’t see me not eating or drinking dairy products but loading up on the veggies, etc. to balance it all out seems like a great idea.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s