Black Bean Brownies

There’s no way around it, I LOVE CHOCOLATE. It is truly one of my weaknesses. Fortunately, veganism does not mean you have to give it up, just be more discerning about what kind and in what form you are eating it. These brownies, adapted from allrecipes.com, are not only gooey and chocolaty, they are jam packed full of fiber, protein, and omega 3’s—making them ideal for a not-so-sinful treat.
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The Easiest Bread You’ll Ever Make!

Part-Whole Wheat Chia Bread

When I first arrived in Korea, I may or may not have had a little break down over the lack of edible bread. I knew it was coming, as I’d read many threads about expats in Korea scouting for bread. They all said the same thing: the bread here sucks. And they were right. Once I got over my pouting stage and moved on to solving my bread problem, I felt like super woman. Those of you who read Mj and a Sea of Stories may recall the night Ibrought an oven home on the subway, all by myself. That very night I was busy baking.
Since coming to Korea, I’ve only purchased bread once—some “rye” bread from Costco that turned out to be not so rye-y—total disappointment. The rest of our bread consumption has been different variations of this VERY simple recipe. I was first introduced to the recipe by the mother of one of the children I nannied for last year. She got it from the book Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day. Of course, I modified it to add some extra goodness (taste and health).

This recipe makes about 4 loaves of bread. The idea is that you make the dough, store it inthe fridge, and then rip off a chunk when you want to bake it. The book claims it saves for up to 2 weeks but I say more like 10 days. Again, this is the easiest thing in the world and your friends will think you’re AMAZING.

The Basic Recipe:

  • 6 ½ cups flour (I go for half whole wheat, half unbleached white flour. Sometimes I use all whole wheat or mix it up with some rye flour)
  • 3 cups luke warm water
  • 1 ½ Tbls yeast
  • 1 ½ Tbls kosher salt (or whatever is available)
  • Cornmeal—to keep the dough from sticking to the board and pizza stone/pan

 

Directions:

  • Stir yeast and salt into water
  •  Pour in flour and mix well with a wooden spoon—no need to kneed (pun intended)
  •  Cover mixing container with a towel or a lid—not air tight and let rise for about 2hours.
  •  Once dough has doubled in size, dust with flour and cut off a chuck (about grapefruitsize isusually good).
  • Form into a ball and place it on a cornmeal covered surface (pizza peal is you haveone)
  •  Let sit for about 40-60 minutes. During this time preheat the oven to 450 degrees. If youhave a pizza stone, it should be in the oven preheating as well. This will ensure that the  bread is getting heat from all directions.
  •  When your ready to bake it, dust the loaf with flour and cut slashes into the bread using a serrated knife.
  • Pop that sucker in the oven along with a small oven safe dish containing water (this will make the crust nice and crispy).
  • Bake for 30-35 minutes
  •  Remove from oven and let cool for 10-15 minutes before cutting.
  •  Store the extra dough in the refrigerator for in a covered food safe container.
  •  Make sure to share!

 

Variations

There are a million different variations so don’t limit yourself! Here are some of our favorites:

  • chia seeds, sunflower seeds, sesame seeds
  • olives
  • sun dried tomatoes
  • rosemary and olive oil

When I’m ready to bake a loaf of bread, I simply cut off the size I want, flatten it a bit on a floured surface and add in the desired goodies. Then I fold the dough over itself and work it with my hands until the add-ins are spread somewhat evenly throughout the dough. Then start from step 6 and proceed as normal.